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21 posts focusing on Equity and Justice

A “Green New Deal” for the oceans must prioritize social justice beyond infrastructure

“A green new deal for the oceans must prioritize social justice beyond infrastructure” adds to a recently published peer-reviewed article which declares that oceans are largely absent or separate from the policy proposals listed in the GND. The timely paper published by Dundas et al. (2020) argues the importance of extending the values and proposed strategies of the GND to the oceans, including investing in infrastructure, renewable energy, food security, and habitat restoration.

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Salish Sea Equity & Justice Symposium Final Report Available

The 2019 Salish Sea Equity and Justice Symposium was created to amplify voices of historically underrepresented and marginalized groups within the environmental field in the Salish Sea and Pacific Northwest Coast region. During this two-day event, leaders from all types of environmental professional backgrounds convened to discuss how to integrate diversity, equity, and inclusion throughout their operations and environmental work.

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How Native Tribes Are Taking the Lead on Planning for Climate Change

For thousands of years, the indigenous peoples of the West Coast would build rock walls at the low tide line, allowing sand to pile up behind them, making the slope of the beach gentler, and expanding the area of the intertidal zone that clams like to call home. These simple clam gardens are effective at boosting shellfish numbers, and have long been used to improve food security for traditional peoples.

Climate Impacts Group's Meade Krosby was quoted in this article from Yale Environment 360.

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Natures, Peoples, and Justice Talk

Natures, Peoples, and Justice: Collaborative land management and cultural burns in the Australian Capital Territory
When: February 6, 2020 | 4:00-5:30 p.m.
Where: Communications (CMU) 120
Dr. Jessica Weir, PhD, Institute for Culture and Society, Western Syndey University
With the cultural and political resurgence of Indigenous peoples globally, and global alarm about environmental issues, there has been a burgeoning of contexts for Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples and institutions to form environmental collaborations. 

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Are fishers poor? Getting to the bottom of marine fisheries income statistics

New research reveals fishers’ incomes are below national poverty lines in over one third of countries with data
The links between fishing livelihoods and poverty are often discussed in both marine conservation and international development conversations, such as United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and Blue Economy. Yet, the lack of fishing income data impedes sound management and allows biased perceptions about fishers’ status to persist.  

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EarthLab Salon 2020: Propose a talk

EarthLab’s mission is to work in partnership with others to accelerate and focus UW expertise to address large-scale environmental challenges, making a positive impact on people’s lives and livelihoods. Underpinning this mission is a commitment to put equity and justice at the core of our work. We recognize that addressing complex environmental challenges requires an understanding of how inequities and injustices are both causes and consequences of such issues. 

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Doris Duke Scholars engage underserved communities around environmental sustainability

Dedication. Passion. Determination. Resilience. Pride. The Doris Duke Conservation Scholars exuded these feelings and many others during the Conservation Scholar Summit, where individuals shared connections with their communities, cultures and environment. Most significantly, they planted their banners of belonging to the environmental movement — a fitting conclusion to the scholars’ summer.
ECOSS was fortunate to host two Doris Duke scholars this summer: Pheng Lor, a UC Berkeley student focusing on conservation and LGBT studies, and MaKail Crawford, hailing from Wesleyan University working on classics and Latino studies. 

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Changing the faces and future of conservation

One morning in July, Sierra Campbell awoke in a tent and unzipped the flap to a view of mountain prairie bathed in sunlight. Though she’d been exploring Washington for weeks, the scene touched the UW sophomore from Fife in a way that reinforced her desire to make a difference in the environment.
It was one of many impressions Campbell collected through the summer as she and a diverse group of undergraduates took a crash course in the region’s natural resources. 

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