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Internships

EarthLab offers internships to both graduate and undergraduates interested exploring innovative ways to address complex issues around people an nature. Our next call for interns will be in December, 2018.

Current and Past Interns

Jane Calderbank
2018 Intern · Epistemological Environments: Defying Teleology in the Anthropocene

Jane Calderbank

Jane Calderbank studies anthropology at Reed College. Reflecting on her experiences transitioning from a student of STEM to a student of anthropology, her approach explores how chosen discipline and gender identity coalesce to privilege certain modes of knowledge creation over others. She focuses on epistemological discrepancies between environmentally-centered disciplines to dissect climate change discourse, especially as it relates to expertise. In interviews with scholars of queer/feminist theory, natural science, and social science, Jane asks, “What are the functions and faults of expertise? How do certain fields carry a gendered character?” “Do gendered stigmas contribute to the prevention of a full understanding of climate change?” “Why is quantitative data favored over qualitative?” Also a dedicated poet, Jane plans to transform her findings into ethnographic poetry to encourage interdisciplinary communication as well as empower alternate conceptions of being, space, and future.

Satenik Avedisyan
2018 Intern · Videography

Satenik Avedisyan

Satenik joins C3 as a sophomore interested in both communications as well as law societies and justice. Satenik enjoys filmmaking and photography and has helped create various short films. She is excited to learn more about environmental science and to apply her background in filmmaking to communicate ideas of conservation with the general public. Her first project worked on a video that advertised the climate change video contest. It blended clips from past submissions and gave information on the contest requirements. She hopes to help make a difference in the environmental community through her contributions.

Jon Akira Doyle
2018 Intern · Videography

Jon is entering his senior year as an Environmental Studies student. He is creating a short video about

Jon Akira Doyle

Health & Nature for a Kickstarter Campaign, featuring visual and audio clips from the Northwest Nature and Health Symposium. His final product will be heavily informed by his studies at the UW and his work with conservation groups, including Pollinator Partnership and Environment Washington. Jon plans to develop his videography skills throughout while further pursuing the human health benefits of surrounding oneself with nature, in its various shapes and forms. In the future, he will be studying how to mitigate anthropogenic stresses on the planet. That may include developing more political clout around a trans-Pacific environmental movement or restoring degraded urban areas in his local community.

Tyler Ung
2018 Intern · Using Visual Art to Provoke Moral Inquiry and Environmental Advocacy

Tyler Ung

Tyler Ung, used line drawings superimposed on photographs to provoke moral inquiry and collective action about issues of sustainability in our everyday lives, such as climate change, plastic pollution, and landscape alterations. His project was titled, “A Mind’s Meadow: Beauty beyond Suppression.” Following a study abroad quarter in China and India, Tyler combined field research and art to explore how these three countries, along with the United States are intricately connected in their responsibility for global sustainability. Specifically, he focused on how waste generation is experienced and perceived differently in Beijing, Bangalore, and Seattle. In an online exhibit of more than 35 visual artworks, Tyler explored how art can raise awareness of the complexities and inefficiencies in our systems, shape cultural, moral, and aesthetic values, and thereby promote environmental consciousness and advocacy.

Ava Holmes
2018 Intern · Exploring the Social Implications of Elephant Conservation

Ava Holmes

Ava Holmes, asked, “How can we design conservation solutions that enable humans and African elephants to co-exist peacefully?” While ivory poaching is detrimental to elephants, humans, and other animals alike, popular media rarely addresses the complexity of why it continues. Through video-recorded interviews, Ava explored various perspectives on the conservation of African Elephants and created new media that dives deeper into the social dynamics around poaching. Interviewees were selected for their expertise and unique perspectives, ranging from an anthropologist working with indigenous tribes living in close corridors with elephants, to the director of a major conservation organization, to a prominent elephant researcher. Ava anticipates that understanding the human intentions surrounding elephant poaching and conservation is a pathway to solutions that better address both human and elephant needs. In her spare time, Ava blends a passion for elephants, conservation—and fashion!

Jasmmine Ramgotra
2017 Intern · Change from Within: Diversifying the Environmental Movement

Jasmmine Ramgotra

Jasmmine Ramgotra began working with us as a UW senior, double majoring in Environmental Studies and Dance. She conducted interviews with leaders in academia, government, non-profits, and the business community to assess awareness and scope solutions for the lack of diversity in environmental fields. She then interpreted those interviews in the format of contemporary dance. Using the interview audio as a sound score, and four dancers to communicate the message, the performance – called Change from Within: Diversifying the Environmental Movement presents clear takeaways about how to create positive change on an individual level. The piece was performed twice in June 2017, at the Seattle Art Museum’s Olympic Sculpture Park, and at the UW Ethnic Cultural Center as a culmination to the Racial Ecologies Conference—and was featured in the UW Environmental Studies newsletter. Jasmmine is now pursuing opportunities to stage additional performances and has launched a new blog called Walking the Border Between Worlds.